The month of Facebook bugs begins!

As posted previously by theharmonyguy…the month of Facebook bugs has begun!

One of our contributors theharmonyguy will hopefully be posting one Facebook application bug per day for the month of September.  He is going to keep this up for the entire month if he can.  He does need your help though!  If you have a bug you found either in Facebook or in a Facebook application, please send it to theharmonyguy [aT] gmail.  Full credit will be given to you for finding a bug.

Lets hope this month we raise some awareness of vulnerabilities in Facebook and the Facebook application platform!  Look for the hashtag of #FAXX on Twitter for news and alerts on new vulnerabilites found this month.

You can find out more information in this great article over at DarkReading on the month of Facebook bugs.

Social Zombies: Your Friends Want To Eat Your Brains Video from DEFCON Posted

The video from the talk Kevin Johnson and I did at DEFCON 17 called “Social Zombies: Your Friends Want To Eat Your Brains” is now up on Vimeo.  If you missed us at DEFCON Kevin and I will be presenting an updated version at OWASP AppSec DC in November.

Share and Enjoy


FacebookTwitterDeliciousDiggStumbleUponAdd to favoritesEmailRSS


Social Media Security Podcast 1 – Zombies, Bad Facebook Apps, Twitter SPAM

skullThis is the first episode of the Social Media Security Podcast.  This episode was hosted by Scott Wright and Tom Eston.  Below are the show notes, links to articles and news mentioned in the podcast:

Please send any show feedback to feedback[aT]socialmediasecurity.com or comment below.  You can also call our voice mail box at 1-613-693-0997 if you have a question for our Q&A section on the next episode.  Thanks for listening!

**You can subscribe to the podcast now in iTunes!

Vote for Inherent Dangers of Real-Time Social Networking panel at #SXSW

SXSW2010_logo_squareWe were happy to see that one of the panels up for selection at the South by Southwest (SXSW) Interactive Festival next year (March 12-16, 2010) is a panel about the security of social networks called “Inherent Dangers of Real-Time Social Networking”.  The way panel selections work st SXSW is that they are up for open voting which ends on September 4th.  Basically the voting works like this (from the SXSW site):

“SXSW is a community-driven event. So, knowing what kinds of topics you want to hear at the event next March is extremely important to us. Your voting accounts for about 30% of the decision-making process for any given programming slot.

Also important is the input of the SXSW Advisory Board, which is a group of industry professionals from across the US and around the world. The final part of the panel decision-making equation is the input of the SXSW staff.”

So yes, you have a big part in the selection process!  This panel includes the following participants:

Jennifer Leggio (@mediaphyter), ZDNet
John Adams (@netik), Twitter operations and security incident response team
Damon Cortesi (@dacort), security consultant at Sevicron, founder of TweetStats, Twitter app developer
Mike Murray (@mmurray), CISO of Foreground Security

Awesome, awesome group for this panel.  Here is the description of the panel (from the SXSW PanelPicker site):

“There’s plenty of chatter about social media and security issues, from social engineering to the naïveté of users. This panel of experts will explore how cyber criminals are taking advantage of socnets flaws and lack of user awareness, and what both individuals and companies can do to help protect themselves.”

Since this is one of the biggest media conferences of the year, we highly encourage you to vote for this panel.  This will be one not to miss if selected!  What are you waiting for?  Go vote now!

Old News: Twitter can be used for Botnet Command & Control

Shocking but true…today a researcher discovered that Twitter has been used for command and control of a botnet which may have been used by Brazilian hackers to steal online banking login information.  Kudos to the researcher, Jose Nazario, who found this.  It was an interesting read to say the least.  The bot would basically look for base64 encoded commands on a Twitter account to download malware via RSS feeds with obfuscated (shortened) URL’s.  Interesting…sounds a lot like Robin Wood’s tool KreiosC2 which was released at DEFCON 17.  I even did this demo showing what else? Base64 encoded commands.  Ironically, I showed off the first version of this code at Notacon 6 back in April of this year.  Keep in mind, KreiosC2 can be used for legitimate tasks like controlling things at home remotely via Twitter.  I highly recommend you read Robin’s detailed write-up on how KreiosC2 functions.

What I find fascinating (like most things in security) is that now that there has been a real confirmed case of using Twitter for botnet C2 (Command & Control) the media seems to be jumping on it and even trying to determine “why it took so long for hackers to take Twitter to the dark side”.  Well, you can’t say we didn’t warn you.

The point that Robin, myself and others were trying to make way back in April was that this is a real threat and the bad guys have probably started to use Twitter for C2 even before Robin put out the code!  We were hoping that by releasing the code Twitter (and others) would see this as perhaps an early warning of things to come and perhaps prepare some defense for it (yes, we know it’s hard to put a defense together for something like this).  Now that we have a confirmed case used for malicious purposes we hope Twitter takes this seriously and can combat future C2 channels used for very bad things.  It always takes something bad to happen to create change…where have you heard that before? :-)

Share and Enjoy


FacebookTwitterDeliciousDiggStumbleUponAdd to favoritesEmailRSS


Sex Offenders in IL Banned from Social Networking Sites

There was an interesting post on Mashable today about a new law that was just passed in Illinois by the governor Pat Quinn.  Basically, it bans sex offenders from using social networking sites.  The problem is that social networking is so loosely defined that this could mean any news site or blog.  Think about Facebook Connect or anything that shows a profile picture with media links and/or text.  In addition, how would this stop a sex offender from using an alias and/or fake name on these sites (if you can even define what these sites are)?

There is some interesting conversation brewing around this one especially around the fact that just by peeing in public you are considered a sex offender in 13 states!

Read the entire article on Mashable here.

View proposed changes to the Facebook SRR/ToS

fb_governanceYou can view and comment on changes to the Facebook SRR (Statement of Rights and Responsibilities or better known as “Terms of Service”) located on the Facebook Governance Page.  You can download and review the redlined proposed changes here.  The deadline for comment is 12pm PST August 18th.  It is important for Facebook users to review these new terms as there are significant changes to the SRR and the wording that is used.  Most of the SRR will affect your privacy as a Facebook user.

For example, make sure you note the following:

1. For content that is covered by intellectual property rights, like photos and videos (“IP content”), you specifically give us the following permission, subject to your privacy and application settings: you grant us a non‐exclusive, transferable, sub‐licensable, royalty free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook (“IP License”).  This IP License ends when you delete your IP content or your account (unless your content has been shared with others, and they have not deleted it).

3. When you add an application and use Platform, your content and information is shared with the application.  We require applications to respect your privacy settings, but your agreement with that application will control how the application can use the content and information you share.

4. When you publish content or information using the “everyone” setting, it means that everyone, including people off of Facebook, will have access to that information and we may not have control over what they do with it.

You should already know these things though, right?  :-) Remember: Anything you post to Facebook private or not…consider it public information.  You can leave your comments on the Facebook Governance Page or feel free to comment here.  We would love to hear your opinion of these upcoming changes.

Twitter and Facebook DDoS was Targeted at One User

The following article was just posted over at CNET News regarding the massive DD0S (Distributed Denial of Service) that targeted Twitter, Facebook, LiveJournal and more.

Via CNET News:

A pro-Georgian blogger with accounts on Twitter, Facebook, LiveJournal and Google’s Blogger and YouTube was targeted in a denial of service attack that led to the site-wide outage at Twitter and problems at the other sites on Thursday, according to a Facebook executive.

Read the entire article here.

1 3 4 5 6 7 8