Social Media Security Podcast 29 – Fake Bieber, Facebook Social Engineering Tool, MySpace Who?

This is the 29th episode of the Social Media Security Podcast.  This episode was hosted by Tom Eston and Scott Wright.  Below are the show notes, links to articles and news mentioned in the podcast:

  • MySpace charged for violating user privacy, vows to do better
  • How a fake Justin Bieber “sextorted” hundreds of girls through Facebook
  • FBPwn: A cross-platform Facebook social engineering tool
  • Tom and Scott’s take on the Facebook IPO
  • LinkedIn CSRF (Cross-site Request Forgery) controls attacked
  • Scott gives us an update on his mobile honeystick project
We are still planning on getting back to regular podcasts! Stay tuned.  Please send any show feedback to feedback [aT] socialmediasecurity.com or comment below.  You can also call our voice mail box at 1-613-693-0997 if you have a question for our Q&A section on the next episode.  You can also subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and follow us on Twitter.  Thanks for listening!

The Slow Web

The Slow Web

Jack Cheng maps out a positive vision for a “slow” type of web app:

Timely not real-time. Rhythm not random. Moderation not excess. Knowledge not information. These are a few of the many characteristics of the Slow Web. It’s not so much a checklist as a feeling, one of being at greater ease for the web-enabled products and services in our lives.

Inside Google’s Plan to Build a Catalog of Every Single Thing, Ever

Inside Google’s Plan to Build a Catalog of Every Single Thing, Ever

Alexis Madrigal at The Atlantic on Google’s Knowledge Graph:

This is one of those human knowledge projects that is ridiculous in scope and possibly in impact. And yet when it gets turned into a consumer product, all we see is a useful module for figuring out Tom Cruise’s height more quickly. In principle, this is both good and bad. It’s good because technology should serve human needs and we shouldn’t worship the technology itself. It’s bad because it’s easy to miss out on the importance of the infrastructure and ideology that are going to increasingly inform the way Google responds to search requests. And given that Google is many people’s default portal to the world of information, even a subtle change in the company’s toolset is worth considering.

And that’s how I found myself on the phone with John Giannandrea discussing mojitos and semantic graphs.

Sounds like another stab at the Semantic Web. It’ll be interesting to see how Facebook’s Open Graph actions play out in this space as well.

Facebook Privacy and Security Article on ConsumerReports

I wanted to pass along a really good article on Facebook Privacy that was released on ConsumerReports.org.  There are some good quotes from others in the security and privacy community including Kevin Johnson and Ed Skoudis.  Check out the article here:

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2012/06/facebook-your-privacy/index.htm

 

Social Media Security Podcast 28 – Facebook Timeline, US Privacy Questions, Twitter Acquisitions

This is the 28th episode of the Social Media Security Podcast recorded back a few months ago.  Content is still relevant! :-) This episode was hosted by Tom Eston and Scott Wright.  Below are the show notes, links to articles and news mentioned in the podcast:

Don’t worry! We are still planning on getting back to regular podcasts.  Stay tuned.  Please send any show feedback to feedback [aT] socialmediasecurity.com or comment below.  You can also call our voice mail box at 1-613-693-0997 if you have a question for our Q&A section on the next episode.  You can also subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and follow us on Twitter.  Thanks for listening!

 

Facebook Privacy & Security Guide Updated to v3.0

I’ve finally updated the Facebook Privacy & Security Guide to version 3.0.  This is a major revision which includes directions on how to set the latest privacy and security controls in Facebook.  Maintaining this guide has been challenging over the last year as Facebook has made major changes multiple times in regards to the way privacy settings are enabled.  Having said that, this is a great time to use my guide and review what your privacy settings are.  Things like enabling secure browsing, login approvals and limiting the audience to what you post are more important then ever.

As always, feel free to distribute this guide to friends and family!  Happy Thanksgiving!

Download v3.0 of the Facebook Privacy & Security Guide here

Social Media Security Podcast 27 – Facebook Friend Unlock, The Anti-Facebook, Facebook Games

This is the 27th episode of the Social Media Security Podcast recorded November 11, 2011.  This episode was hosted by Tom Eston and Scott Wright.  Below are the show notes, links to articles and news mentioned in the podcast:

Please send any show feedback to feedback [aT] socialmediasecurity.com or comment below.  You can also call our voice mail box at 1-613-693-0997 if you have a question for our Q&A section on the next episode.  You can also subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and follow us on Twitter.  Thanks for listening!

The race for the most personal Twitter followers

I have had a great reply on this topic while going around the USA talking about social media security.  During my talk I give an example of why it is NOT okay to allow just anyone the right to follow you or vise versa.

I choose a volunteer out of the crowd.  Usually a nice looking woman because…why not.  I give a hypothetical situation.  We were dating and things are starting to get serious.  So serious that I take her to meet my mom for the first time. While we are at my ma’s house, I introduce her to my new brother-in-law.  My brother-in-law was in charge of bringing the dinner rolls and once again forgot.  He asks her to go to the Italian (not french) bakery down the road with him to get these rolls.  She says yes.  While they are picking up the rolls he notices that he forgot his wallet and asked her for $4.98 to cover the rolls.  She just happens to have $5.00 in her left pocket.

Would she give him the $5.00 and why?

The answer has always been “yes” and because he is associated or was introduced to her by me.  There is an applied level of trust set prior to them going to the bakery.  Well this level of trust in my opinion can be accomplished within twitter.  If I follow you and we start having a friendly conversation(your favorite sports team) I will then go after your friends and family for a small amount to help me with my “cure/run/walk”.  All I have to do is introduce myself as your friend as they can see our past conversations in twitter.  I  have had a over 90% success rate of getting their followers to click my cause link.  This success is based on the applied trust between two strangers.  So although it is really #kwel to have 70,000 twitter followers it can also cost your friends and family $4.98

For more information feel free…info@unixbox.ws

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