Social Media Security Podcast 27 – Facebook Friend Unlock, The Anti-Facebook, Facebook Games

This is the 27th episode of the Social Media Security Podcast recorded November 11, 2011.  This episode was hosted by Tom Eston and Scott Wright.  Below are the show notes, links to articles and news mentioned in the podcast:

Please send any show feedback to feedback [aT] socialmediasecurity.com or comment below.  You can also call our voice mail box at 1-613-693-0997 if you have a question for our Q&A section on the next episode.  You can also subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and follow us on Twitter.  Thanks for listening!

Taking over the Facebook Page “buy now” button (Part 2 of 2)

As I have been testing the security settings of companies social media strategies, I have consistently noticed two things, marketing is desperately trying to find its ROI and IT/Security doesn’t even know they have a FB page.  I do agree that after a number of months, it is time to show the CFO that spending that insame amount of time on their social media sites is worth the payroll checks. Unfortunately, analytics alone have been a blurry way of making that compelling argument and can be defeated by saying, if, I had put those payroll checks into google…I could see our ROI in a nice neat report. This is one of the reasons that marketing is jumping head first into technologies like Shoutlet, payvment or others (FB E-commerce). Why not sell your items on your FB Page?  Your team has worked extremely hard to get thousands of new users to click follow/like. Ultimately, this is going to be the future of pages but because IT/Security is not involved in the social media process it also opens a HUGE GAPPING HOLE in your security policy and procedures. And of course here is your example:

The policy of company ACME is “no social networking allowed” on internal networks.  Sites are being blocked at the firewall with rules and enforced with a content filtering tool. IT/Security has done its job with social media, right? BUT an exception is made for Marketing because they are special people. A FB page was created as well as an E-Commerce app installed without consulting IT/Security. I know this because after taking over the FB page using our friends Cain and Able, I replaced just one of the “buy now” buttons to redirect it my site and used analytics to see how many people clicked this button.  Showing this to Director of IT he replied “I didn’t even know we had a FB Page.”

Part 2

After this meeting we agreed to stop and allow IT/ Security to be a part of the implementation of this new e-com solution and lock down this new site.  After a couple of months we were given the green light that all social media was secure and our attacks would now #fail.  Well they were wrong!  Here is what happened;  Technology constantly changes and therefor we should also be constantly training/testing these changes.  Yes, all https was checked.  Yes, they read www.socialmediasecurity.com on a regular basis.  But they forgot to monitor their social media accounts like they would an email server.  There is still a core failure in my opinion of Facebook pages.  Who?!? owns the data and when is it okay to monitor the admins personal accounts? Because these users of the pages still enjoy using Facebook for personal use. They do not apply the corporate rules to their personal accounts nor should they if that is how they live.  So, we are either forced to create fake accounts or all share one admin account.  Well with our testing we are still targeting the admins of these pages.  There are many many ways to gain access to their accounts and once in, we only have to create our own evil twin account to keep access.  Example: if Bob Alice is the admin of the page just create another Bob Alice and copy the information including the  profile imagine and allow this new user admin rights to the page.  Most common users will just think this is a Facebook glitch and it is showing their profile twice. But in reality it is a way for us to keep a constant admin account to this system.  If you maintain a Facebook page you know that admins just lose their rights to the page all the time out of the blue.  So constantly adding the same person is a regular process.  If the company was monitoring its data it would see these changes or see that there were in fact 2 different accounts attached to this page.  But we are not monitoring these accounts, yet. Social media security can be a full time job depending on the risk and frequency of the sites.   For more information feel free as always to email me.  info@unixbox.ws

Social Media Security Podcast 25 – Facebook Security Updates, FaceNiff, Social Media Background Checks

This is the 25th episode of the Social Media Security Podcast recorded July 1, 2011.  This episode was hosted by Tom Eston and Scott Wright.  Below are the show notes, links to articles and news mentioned in the podcast:

Please send any show feedback to feedback [aT] socialmediasecurity.com or comment below.  You can also call our voice mail box at 1-613-693-0997 if you have a question for our Q&A section on the next episode.  You can also subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and follow us on Twitter.  Thanks for listening!

Firesheep’s Revenge

No, this is not an article on the new version or even newly added super hero features for firesheep? #titlefail? Maybe but please read on then decide.

I know firesheep has lost its shiny coin syndrome with most but the attack is still working quite well in the field.  While the readers/listeners have been doing a good job of enabling secure browsing options in Twitter and Facebook, we still have a long way to go. Please keep spreading the word and keep pleading to social networking sites to enable secure browsing by default.  So, Why the “Firesheep’s Revenge” title?  Well these last month’s, a couple of us have been testing common social media monitoring (SMM) tools.  These tools are generally used by small businesses, internal marketing, or external marketing companies to help update social media accounts without the hassle of logging into every social networking site individually.  We have been testing these SSM’s and found that:

http://hootsuite.com/dashboard#
http://sproutsocial.com/dashboard
http://standard.cotweet.com/channels#

Are not using secure browsing by default, allowing us to hijack sessions.  What does this mean? Well by adding your social media accounts into these SMM tools, you are granting the tool permission or full control over that account(s). By gaining control over the tool we are bypassing all the hard work you did by enabling secure browsing in each of your twitter and facebook accounts.  Try explaining to the VP of Marketing that even though you checked the “defeat firesheep” box it still works. And not only will it work on Facebook/Twitter but now LinkedIn, Foursquare, ping.fm and Ning accounts all in one interface. Most of the time we were looking at full access to the corporations social media strategy. So, we are right back to where we started, teaching the user that security is usually the last thing on the mind of these rapid development firms. If you do not see the option of “secure browsing”, then please be careful of where you update your social media accounts. Ask your tool makers where this option is located.  If they do not have this option then maybe you should look for another tool.

James F. Ruffer III
Unixbox
@jruffer

Social Zombies Gone Wild: Totally Exposed and Uncensored

Kevin Johnson and Tom Eston gave the third and final “Social Zombies” talk at Notacon 8 this weekend.  This talk focused on how social networks are using geolocation and the abuse of location based services.

“Social networks have jumped onto the geolocation bandwagon with location-based tweets, status updates, check-ins, mayorships, and more. This doesn’t take into account EXIF, QR codes, and advancements in HTML 5 geo implementations, which are being built into these location-based services. This is often implemented and enabled without the user even knowing it. In fact, geolocation is one of the hottest technologies being used in everything from web browsers to mobile devices. As social networks throw our location coordinates around like candy, its only natural that bad things will happen and abuse will become more popular. This presentation will cover how social networks and other websites are currently using location-based services, what they plan on doing with it, and a discussion on the current privacy and security issues. We will also discuss the latest geolocation hacking techniques and will release custom code that can abuse all of the features being discussed.”

Slides are on SlideShare below:

Social Media Security Podcast 24 – Personal Social Media Accounts, Cree.py, ProfileSpy, App Privacy

This is the 24th episode of the Social Media Security Podcast recorded April 6, 2011.  This episode was hosted by Tom Eston and Scott Wright with special guest James Ruffer. Below are the show notes, links to articles and news mentioned in the podcast:

Please send any show feedback to feedback [aT] socialmediasecurity.com or comment below.  You can also call our voice mail box at 1-613-693-0997 if you have a question for our Q&A section on the next episode.  You can also subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and follow us on Twitter.  Thanks for listening!

Why Should the CSO Care About an Employee’s Personal Social Media Account?

Thank you to Tom for allowing me to participate with social media security dot com. The guys in this community have been great resources in helping me to spread the word on the insecurities with social media. This year, I have been reaching beyond the security space, speaking to many social media clubs, podcampers and O’Reilly conferences only to realize something disheartening. Not enough people hear or are listening to us! I am going to start posting some real experiences to help with the questions of “why should I care about social media security?”

This week at Podcampnashville I was able to demo firesheep and in 3 mins and 48 secs, 64 accounts were in my sidebar waiting for me to double click. After the demo I had some great questions and just like that the session was over.  Later a young lady came to me and admitted she was 1 of the 64 in the sidebar. She asked me to show her what I “could” of done with her account. She was not really impressed or scared that I could of updated the profile, chat with friends or add creepy users.  Then fear came very quickly when I changed from the user account to the PAGES she had admin rights.

She is in charge of the facebook pages of 12 major medical practices in the area. I have to be honest she rocked at maintaining these pages. Impressed by her work, I asked how long she had into these pages and followers. Time was in the 1000’s of hours and also in the $100,000 range of billable time.  My final question to her was…what would she do if all of this time and money came crashing down by some idiot at a camp running a free Moz Plug-in. She said she would hunt them down. She was kidding of course but I was a little scared to be honest. We went over some settings and she is now going to help spread the word. 1 out of 64 down.

Facebook Pages security is basically in the hands of the personal accounts of the admins.  This is one reason why the CSO should care…

Things that make you go HMMMM? <- point to head -Arsenio Hall
Facebook terms and conditions state that you have to have a personal Facebook account to administrate your company page. Facebook company pages allow multiple users to have access to share content.  Are you monitoring or making sure the people with access is meeting your company security standards? If an employee has left, is Facebook Page access part of the account removal process?

Social Media Security Podcast 23 – Recent Changes to Facebook, Enterprise Social Media Tools, Spokeo

This is the 23rd episode of the Social Media Security Podcast recorded February 25th, 2011.  This episode was hosted by Tom Eston and Scott Wright. Below are the show notes, links to articles and news mentioned in the podcast:

Please send any show feedback to feedback [aT] socialmediasecurity.com or comment below.  You can also call our voice mail box at 1-613-693-0997 if you have a question for our Q&A section on the next episode.  You can also subscribe to the podcast in iTunes and follow us on Twitter.  Thanks for listening!

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